Even More FREE Ways to Track Online Buzz


Back by popular demand, more (free!) ways to track your web presence and buzz online. Many of your recall our previous posts on the topic…Easy and FREE Ways to Track Your Online Presence…Plus, See What California is Up To, More FREE Ways to Track Your Web Presence and Quick Case Study: Google Trends…and we wanted to highlight two ways to track the ever mysterious ‘social networking buzz.’

Before we dig into the options, it should be said that both of these solutions simply provide a rough idea of buzz related to each site…in this case, Facebook and Twitter. Personally, I would not necessarily include these numbers in my annual report, but they will give you a look into what is being discussed on these undeniably popular websites.

However, if you are one of those organizations who are purposely running a ‘Gen-X’ Facebook campaign to generate buzz, then I would be looking at these charts every hour…in between games of solitaire, of course.

Facebook Lexicon:
Facebook’s new Lexicon feature (Facebook login required) allows you to view words and phrases that have been written or left on a user’s wall…think of it as viewing all of the comments friends have left on your profile page. While certainly not scientific, the data does give you a good idea of what people on Facebook are talking, thinking, doing. For example, look at the chart below comparing recent movies Indiana Jones, Iron Man and Speed Racer.

Notice the huge spike in ‘words’ for Iron Man around April 30th (premiered May 2nd) and then the fairly large drop-off. You can also see that buzz for Indiana Jones is building, however mentions of Speed Racer barely registered on the graph.
http://www.facebook.com/lexicon

Twist:
Developed by Flaptor, Twist is another buzz monitoring application, this time for Twitter. If you are not familiar with Twitter, it is basically a running list of what you are doing at the time, limited to 140 characters (be concise!).

Twitter is quickly becoming a near instant source of information when news breaks…beyond just simple messages of going to the grocery store…so, monitoring Twitter can be a key way to stay ahead of any bad press or negative reviews.

Again, like Lexicon, simply type in two or more words to compare results. Let’s try the same sample set:



(Can’t see the graph? View it on the Travel 2.0 blog.)

Well, if I am working on the Indiana Jones promo campaign I can enjoy a long weekend. If I was working on the Speed Racer campaign, I have probably been enjoying long weekends for awhile.

In addition to this data, Twist also allows you to see what context these keywords have been used. Click on the ‘see what people are saying about indiana jones‘ link and follow the conversation.

For example:

ivyaurora: We saw the new Indiana Jones movie today right after coming out of the field.

Lirianna: Just got to the theater to see Indiana Jones… hope it’s worth it. I want real food! : (

SinnedSoul: Just got back from Indiana Jones…not bad, not bad at all. If you’re a fan of the others you’ll like this one. The theme is silly though.

instapundit: : KYLE SMITH DOESN’T LIKE the new Indiana Jones movie, calling it “the worst Steven Spielberg popcorn..

rossdavis: @explodey friendly monkeys from Indiana Jones

What do you know, regular people are just like you and I!
http://twist.flaptor.com

Full credit to TechCrunch, who featured a post about this topic a few weeks ago.

Comment? @travel2dot0 or email.